Social and cultural resilience and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers (SCREAM) in prison

Registration is now open for our August monthly seminar series

Eileen Baldry, Professor of Criminology at UNSW

This seminar will focus on discussing the Social and cultural resilience and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison (SCREAM) project and its role in leading to improved outcomes for Indigenous women.

Social and cultural resilience and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers (SCREAM) in prison

 When: Wednesday 8th August 2018

 Time: 5.30pm – 7.30pm

 Where: Cullen Room, Level 4, Holme Building, Science Road, University of Sydney

 Registration: This event is free but we encourage tax deductible donations to help cover the cost of catering. Suggested donation is $50.

RSVP Essential. Drinks & nibbles available.

 REGISTER TO ATTEND

This seminar may qualify for CPD points.

 Download the directions and parking

About the speaker

Eileen Baldry Professor of Criminology, UNSW

Eileen’s dedication to social justice is illustrated through her vast research on various issues including mental health and cognitive disability in the criminal justice system; homelessness and transition from prison; and indigenous social work. Eileen has held voluntary roles with different social justice agencies including the Board of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC). Eileen received the renowned Justice Medal in 2009 for her remarkable commitment and support for justice-related issues. Eileen’s current ‘SCREAM’ project is committed to improving justice by examining ways to address health inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous incarcerated mothers, female carers and mothers in the community.

 

For any queries please contact the Foundation Coordinator, Chloe Wyatt, 0405 256756 or foundation@wlsnsw.org.au

Hosted by Women’s Legal Service NSW

These monthly talks will provide opportunity to exchange ideas, inform change and share research. Each month we will discuss the latest developments in legal issues that directly impact women and children.

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